Unité Mixte
de Recherche

Biologie et Génétique
des Interactions Plante-Parasite
 

CIRAD
UMR-BGPI TA A-54/K
Campus International
de Baillarguet
34398 Montpellier Cedex 5
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Copyright © CIRAD 2009
Group 2 : Interactions Virus Insect Plant (VIP) Research interest

Impact of abiotic stresses on the rate of vector-transmission of plant viruses
Leader of the project: Manuella van Munster & Stéphane Blanc
 

Abiotic stresses affect the development of viral infection within host plants. The aim of this project is to evaluate how abiotic stresses associated to global changes may impact on the rate of vector transmission and thus on epidemiology of viruses.



Staff involved in the project

M. van Munster
Researcher
Leader of the project
S. Blanc
Researcher
co-leader of the project
M. Yvon
Technician
 

 

Background and state of the art

Ecological impacts of climate change are becoming more apparent with many consequences such as drought stress, salinity and high temperatures among others. These major abiotic stresses, combined to biotic stresses such as plant pathogens, are a threat to crop production worldwide. Among plant pathogens, viruses are a major constraint and are responsible for tremendous agronomic and socio-economic impacts. Transmission efficiency is an essential step in the infection cycle of plant viruses and depend in most cases on insect vectors, aphids outperforming all others. Strategies to enhance plant virus transmission and spread are diverse and mainly include alterations of insect vector behaviour by vector-borne-viruses.
In this project we propose to test a new hypothesis directly inspired from recent studies showing the capacity that viruses have to react to cues from the environment of their host plants via the plant signalling pathways (Gutierrez et al., 2013). The fact that a virus can sense and react to a biotic stress such as the presence of its vector feeding on the host plant, and accordingly changes its behaviour within infected cells to favour transmission has been proven for the Cauliflower mosaic virus in our lab (Martiniere et al. 2013).

Since plant signalling pathways and responses to various abiotic stresses are partly shared with those induced by viral infection, and the fact that they can interfere with one another it is tempting to speculate on the possibility that some plant stresses could falsely be perceived as a vector signal by the virus. Such misleading viral reactions could lead to a better transmission under a perturbated environment with putative important ecological impacts.

The aim of this project is to evaluate how abiotic stresses associated to global changes may impact on the rate of vector transmission and thus on epidemiology of viruses.
Abiotic stresses affect the development of viral infection within host plants. The aim of this project is to evaluate how abiotic stresses associated to global changes may impact on the rate of vector transmission and thus on epidemiology of viruses.
 

Publications list on the topic

Van Munster, M., Yvon, M., Vile, D., Dader, B., Fereres, A., Blanc, S., 2017. Water deficit enhances the transmission of plant viruses by insect vectors. PLoS One 12(5): 473 e0174398.

Martinière A., Bak A., Macia J.L., Lautredou N., Gargani D., Doumayrou J., Garzo E, Moreno A., Fereres, A. Blanc S & Drucker M.(2013) A virus responds instantly to the presence of the vector on the host and forms transmission morphs. Elife doi: 10.7554/eLife.00183.

Gutiérrez S., Michalakis Y., van Munster M. & Blanc S. (2013) Plant feeding by insect vectors can affect life cycle, population genetics and evolution of plant viruses. Functional Ecology 27 : 610-622.

 

   
 
 
   
   
   
 
 
 
asques et ascospores de Magnaporthe orizae - copyright : JL Notteghem spores Magnaporthe oryzae - copyright : JL Notteghem bactéries Xanthomonas pseudoalbilineans (gauche) et Xanthomonas albilineans (droite). Les deux produisent l'antibiotique albicidine (structure en haut de la photo - copyright : S. Cociancich/A. Mainz
  champignon Magnaporthe (vert) en train d'attaquer une feuille de riz - copyright : A. Delteil/JB Morel test d'anticorps sur puceron (Mysus persicae) - copyright : MS Vernerey/M. van Munster/M. Uzest